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Unravelling Complexity

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All Cayman Islands “4(4)” funds must now register with CIMA
Investment Funds

All Cayman Islands “4(4)” funds must now register with CIMA

The Cayman Islands government has passed the changes to the Mutual Funds Law, which we covered in our prior alert on this topic. These previously-exempt, mutual funds must now assess their operational structures and advisors and register with the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority (CIMA) before 7 August 2020.
EU List of Non-cooperative Jurisdictions for Tax Purposes updated: BVI moved to whitelist, Cayman faulted for not delivering on time
Regulatory and Tax

EU List of Non-cooperative Jurisdictions for Tax Purposes updated: BVI moved to whitelist, Cayman faulted for not delivering on time

The European Union today updated its List of Non-cooperative Jurisdictions for Tax Purposes. While Cayman finalised its legislation earlier this year to regulate private investment funds and updated the Mutual Funds Law to complete the regulatory framework covering other collective investment vehicles, the EU determined that it failed to implement measures relating to economic substance in the area of collective investment vehicles within the agreed timetable (December 2019), and therefore “did not deliver on the commitment on time”, and thus was placed on the blacklist.
Cayman Islands private funds must now register with CIMA
Investment Funds

Cayman Islands private funds must now register with CIMA

The Cayman Islands government has passed the Private Funds Law, 2020 (Law) which requires closed-ended funds to now register with the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority (CIMA). In conjunction with the Law, the government has also passed regulations which clarify the scope of an “alternative investment vehicle” and a “restricted scope private fund”.
Creditors’ interest duty: What to do and when to do it
Litigation, Insolvency and Restructuring

Creditors’ interest duty: What to do and when to do it

It has long been established that company directors come under a duty to take creditors’ interests into consideration when their company is in financial difficulty or enters what is commonly referred to as the “zone of insolvency”. The recognition of this duty arose as early as 1976 in the Australian case of Walker v Wimborne and was subsequently adopted by a number of common law jurisdictions throughout the 1980s.
Offshore legal and fund structure considerations
Investment Funds

Offshore legal and fund structure considerations

Against the backdrop of President Trump’s impeachment, we are not only left considering how this will play out domestically in the US, but also on the wider international stage. The macro picture is exceptionally complicated right now. While the UK seems to be finally stepping towards a conclusion on the Brexit debacle, political instability is rife and the US is certainly no exception.